Tag Archives: British Safety Council

The Power of the Spoken Word

27 Oct

As a writer, you can sometimes forget the power of speech.

This was brought to my attention on Tuesday. Matthew Holder, head of campaigns and engagement, and I presented to a group of apprentices at Kier Building Maintenance in London as part of the European Health and Safety Week.

We were joined by young workers aged 17-26 who were working in gas, electricity, engineering and plumbing. All boys, some had just finished their apprentices, while others were mere weeks into them.

Our presentation focused on engaging the young workers on workplace health and safety. To do this, we gave them examples of how they take responsibility for their safety in their everyday lives. They already look after themselves and their friends on the football pitch, at a nightclub, on holiday. It gave us a good base to talk about attitude and behaviour in the workplace and how it really does have a positive impact on safety.

“We wanted to talk to the apprentices on their level, and hear their ideas of what makes good health and safety at work happen. They shared their ideas and knowledge with us, which was good for us to hear firsthand and great for Kier to know how their training is progressing,” said Matthew after the event.

We also talked about our young worker campaign, Speak Up, Stay Safe, and how that message is at the heart of good health and safety. By speaking to their supervisors, their friends, their family, their mentors, young people can make that first important step to staying safe at work. And we assured them the law was on their side.

This was backed up by the second presentation of the morning. John Callaghan, a Kier health and safety adviser, echoed our message: “If you feel there is something wrong, there usually is – so say something.”

Hearing Matthew and I talk, ask and answer questions on the issues did get them thinking. But watching and listening to the video of Barbara Burke, mother of Steven Burke, who tragically died when he fell from a scaffold at work when he was just 17, clearly got them to consider the terrible consequences of poorly managed workplace health and safety. No one wants those same words to come out of their mother’s mouth. As a reality check and an added kick to the importance of what we were saying, it hit home.

And sometimes that’s it: speaking. We’ve got to take every opportunity we can to talk to young people and give them the chance to be heard. That means everyone: the British Safety Council, employers and colleagues.

Because young people will only use our message – Speak Up, Stay Safe – if there is someone there to listen.

 

Many thanks to Kier Building Maintenance for the invitation. If you would like us to come and talk to your apprentices or young workers, please get in touch.

“I just wanted to express my sincere gratitude for all the hard work you put into making yesterday’s talk a success. I must say I was much impressed with the way everything went. The talk was very relevant and informative and I really liked it because it was very interactive.”

Judith Bilson, health and safety adviser, Kier Islington Ltd.

For more information on Speak Up, Stay Safe please visit www.youtube.com/speakupstaysafe

 

 

 

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British Safety Council responds to HSE cost recovery consultation

24 Oct

The British Safety Council has submitted its views to HSE concerning its proposals to extend it power to charge for specific interventions including where action is taken by the regulator to address a material breach of health and safety law. The British Safety Council based its submission in part on the results of survey of its members and on the knowledge of health and safety regulation and management built up over the last fifty years. Generally, members were content with the proposal, recognising that HSE needs to address its costs and that in principle those who operate outside the law should contribute to the costs of regulatory action.

Alex Botha, the British Safety Council chief executive, said: “In our response we made clear that our members, in the main, felt that the compliant and committed had nothing to fear from these proposals – and were certain that this change would drive improvements and a higher level of compliance and consequently a reduction in workplace injuries and work-related ill health occurrences. Under present arrangements the non-compliant appeared to have an unfair business advantage by not making the investment necessary to effectively control the risk of injury and ill health.”

However concerns were raised by a small but significant number of members about how this change will impact on the regulator/duty holder relationship. Some thought it may create the conditions for a less open relationship between the two. The British Safety Council acknowledged HSE’s commitment to measure the impact of the proposed changes on the level of compliance. However it also though it necessary to measure any indirect impact on the incidence and number of workplace injury and work related ill health occurrences.

The new charging regime is planned to come into force in April 2012.

The importance of risk and hazard education: Professor Löfstedt and the British Safety Council contribute to the debate

21 Oct

The Centre for Socio-Legal Studies at the University of Oxford, with the support of the British Safety Council, convened a workshop in October to examine a number of key issues concerning our knowledge and thinking on hazard and risk and how our policy, law makers and educators approach these issues. The panellists included Professor Ragnar Löfstedt of Kings College, Mark Tyler the leading health and safety lawyer and partner at Shook Hardy & Bacon, Lynda Armstrong, chair of the trustees of the British Safety Council and David Bench, HSE director with responsibility for science and chemical regulation.

Professor Löfstedt’s presentation focused on a paper he had published earlier this year, Risk versus Hazard – How to Regulate in the 21st Century, in which he explored the history of the risk versus hazard debate, focusing in particular on the regulatory approaches adopted by different EU member states in relation to two hazardous substances. Professor Löfstedt argued that there was no clear consensus across EU countries as to when risk or hazard considerations should be the basis of regulatory decision making.

In the recommendations set out in the paper Professor Löfstedt argues: “If European regulators are to be successful in increasingly basing health and environmental regulations on risk assessments then there is a need for the public and stakeholders to actually understand what risk assessment is, something that is clearly not the case at the present time. One way around this would be to push for the introduction of risk assessment as part of the science curriculum, in the final years at school as well as encouraging European universities to teach risk assessment as part of the undergraduate and graduate curriculums …”

Lynda Armstrong, in her panel contribution, agreed with the importance of risk education: “We believe it is time for a sea change in our approach to competence building around risk with a focus on instilling the necessary knowledge and behaviours in people at an early age. The British Safety Council will continue its work of helping young people develop an understanding of health and safety risks and appreciate the behaviours they should adopt in readiness for when they go to work. The benefits are twofold: firstly a better understanding of working safely will discourage inappropriate risk aversion; and second, these young people, the future workforce, will be our champions and will be key to ensuring we build our knowledge and use it wisely concerning hazard and risk.” Lynda also made clear where the British Safety Council stood concerning the effectiveness of our current regulatory framework: “We subscribe strongly to the view that our legislative approach to health and safety, carefully balancing the regulation of hazards and risks, is broadly the correct one and working effectively.”

Professor Löfstedt also gave an indication that the report of the independent panel he is leading on the review of our health and safety regulatory framework is likely to be published at the end of November.

Health & Safety North – a review

10 Oct

Besides the educational seminars, the event showcases an exhibition of new & innovative safety products & services.

The Health & Safety North event proved a success with a healthy flow of visitors for both the exhibition and seminars. Focussing on the seminars, the presentation by Neal Stone, British Safety Council director of policy and research, on the first day looked at the impact of the recent and planned Government reforms of the health and safety regulatory framework. He explored the significant changes taking place in sourcing expert advice and guidance and the likely impact of reduced resources for regulation and enforcement. He said, “The pace of change over the year impacting on health and safety management in the UK has been immense. Not only have we seen significant proposals to change and/or review our health and safety laws, for example, Lord Young’s review and reforms announced by the government earlier this year including Professor Lofstedt’s review of health and safety law, we are starting to see the impact of other non legislative changes. Clearly both HSE and local authorities will have considerably less resources to carry out their responsibilities following the government deficit reduction plans – their priorities will have to change and as we have seen they will have to examine ways in which cost recovery could be increased including, for example, HSE charging fees for its intervention activity to address material breaches of health and safety law by duty holders.

“HSE enforcement priorities have changed with a shift of emphasis towards high and medium hazard sector organisations with a higher level of risk. The occupational health and safety consultants register (OSHCR) a voluntary register developed by HSE in conjunction with health and safety bodies as the British Safety Council is now up and running. It’s too early to say whether it will meet its objective of assisting small organisations to identify expert, competent and suitably qualified health and safety consultants to advice and assist them with their management of risk. We do know that over 2,600 consultants have successfully registered to date.”

He added, “The British Safety Council has consulted its members on all major reforms of the past year – Lord Young’s review, RIDDOR reform, Löfstedt review and proposals by HSE to extend its powers to recovers costs. For the British Safety Council the acid test for the cumulative effect of all of these changes is what impact will they have on our health and safety performance. What will the trends in numbers and incidence of workplace fatal and major injuries and work-related ill health occurrences look like over next five years. Our surveys of our members reveal that the vast majority consider that our framework of health and safety law is working effectively. However there are concerns particular among our small organisation members that the law is incredibly complex to understand making compliance a challenge. The British Safety Council strongly believes that ensuring guidance is accessible, understandable and to the point vital in assisting duty holders to comply with the law.”

On day two, Kevin Bridges, Pinsent Masons LLP partner associate, shared lessons that can be learnt from the first corporate manslaughter prosecution. Bridges represented Cotswold Geotech and its managing director in the prosecution. He outlined the background to the case; the respective arguments advanced by the prosecution and the defence. He said, “The lesson to be learnt by employers is that it has never been more important to ensure that safety management systems are robust and senior managers understand their own health and safety obligations.” He went on to explain the significance of having a clearly defined Incident Response Protocol, incorporating Legal Privilege over accident investigation reports and other internally produced documents.

An inspiring part of the programme was a case study type presentation from Naveed Qamar, Group Safety Director of FirstGroup. He talked about the challenges of managing a workforce of 130,000 people and 2.5 billion passengers, where the challenge is to promote a proactive mindset as opposed to waiting for events to dictate. He gave an insight into how to provide safety leadership internally and externally and the results that can be achieved. He also highlighted a successful initiative on injury prevention by providing each employee a handbook that they carried with them to monitor both negative and positive health and safety actions.

If you missed the Northern event, there is Health & Safety Ireland scheduled for next month.

Paul Gordon reports from the World Congress in Safety and Health in Istanbul, Turkey

13 Sep

Good afternoon everybody. I am reporting from the XIX World Congress in Safety and Health here in Istanbul, Turkey.

It is one of the world’s largest, if not the largest, health and safety conferences. There are reported to be delegates here from more than 120 countries. And it’s hot, far too hot to be wearing a suit and tie.

Istanbul is one of the great cities of the world. Anyone visiting from Western Europe will notice the distinct change in feel and unique character of the place. Spread on either sides of the Bosphorus Strait it is the only city in the world to be situated on two continents, both Europe and Asia. Whilst more closely associated with Europe in political and sporting terms, the city nevertheless feels much more Asian than European.

It’s a lovely old city, dripping in history and culture. In fact, culture is one of the buzzwords at the conference – building a global safety culture.

I’m here to represent the British Safety Council in our public benefit work, and to give presentations in two of the conference symposia. We try to engage with as many stakeholders as possible in order to disseminate our key messages that no one should be killed, injured or made ill by their work, and highlighting the plight of young workers in particular. So far, it’s one down, one to go on the presentation stakes. A very positive reaction to my first delivery yesterday (I would say that I know, but its true), talking about the challenges of engaging with small businesses, with lots of interest in the role played by the British Safety Council. Tomorrow’s presentation will be looking at the British Safety Council campaign for young worker safety.

Some interesting topics throughout the congress. I have been talking with delegates from as far a field as Singapore and Azerbaijan. The UK is represented here by, amongst others, Judith Hackett, Chair of the Health and Safety Executive who spoke about the Global Challenge of a changing world of work and the global economy.

But for now from me its Güle güle (cheerio) from Turkey.

About our blogger

Paul Gordon is the British Safety Council’s policy and research manager.

Health and Safety Scotland – keynote speakers address major health and safety issues at Edinburgh event

8 Sep

Nearly 300 heard Dr Paul Stollard, HSE’s Director for Scotland set out progress the major reforms of health and safety currently taking place and the challenges facing HSE in Scotland. He made clear that the focus remained on preventing workplace injuries and ill health occurrences. The number of workplace fatalities under investigation in Scotland exceeded the number of operational HSE Inspectors.

Donna Hutchison of QuEnSH and Shaun Knott of Casella Measurement contributed excellent presentations on the work of health consultants and noise vibration respectively.

The seminars were rounded by Marion Lamb from Glasgow Housing Association (GHA), the largest social housing provider in Scotland, assisted by Partners from Strathclyde Police and Fire and Rescue Service. The risks faced by GHA employees are immense – indeed hard to comprehend ranging from preventing exposure to hazardous substances to fire and physical assaults.

Marion and her partners brought home powerfully the consequences of not dealing with risks posed to employees by anti social behaviour and the consequences which could lead to serious injury and death.

The British Safety Council will be feeding back important issues coming out of the Edinburgh event at its forthcoming meeting with Ann McKechin Labour MP for Glasgow North and Shadow Secretary for Scotland.

British Safety Council chief executive strengthens ties in India

6 Sep

Alex Botha with staff and apprentices at the Tata Motors Commercial Vehicles Business Unit, in Pune, India, where he presented certificates to six of 100 apprentices to successfully complete British Safety Council Entry Level health and safety training.

The British Safety Council’s chief executive Alex Botha has met some of the world’s most successful multinational businesses in India this week, including Tata Motors, Reliance Industries, ITC and Larsen and Toubro to build on our established strong relationships, develop further business opportunities and explore collaboration on CSR and public benefit projects.

The British Safety Council members in India have been notable over a number of years for their success in both the Sword of Honour and the International Safety Awards.

Alex said: “It is noteworthy that four of the five winners of the inaugural Globe of Honour in 2010 were ITC subsidiaries in India. We have 250 corporate members in India who have achieved 5 Star and OHSAS 18001 success and are leaders in the management of health and safety and the environment.

“A number, including Tata and Reliance, have comprehensive corporate social responsibility programmes which are integral to their business values and cover many issues, including education, health, sustainability, social inclusion and business development, apprenticeships and leadership.

“We are committed to working with our members in India and elsewhere to help improve the performance of their own organisations and share best practice internationally. Increasingly, our global reach and influence with some of the biggest enterprises in the world is becoming much more significant and our expertise respected and sought after.

“Our work with large multinationals increasingly mean we can collaborate in partnership to make a huge difference to the safety culture in countries where traditionally worker safety has been a low priority or no priority at all. In China and India there are significant safety issues to address but by using the example of their exceptional performers we can achieve notable improvements.

“Visionary Indian headquartered companies such as Tata, Reliance, Larsen and Toubro and ITC are leading the way in worker safety innovation and are working closely with us to raise standards across all of the sectors and territories in which they operate. Just these four companies represent market capitalisation well in excess of £100 billion. They occupy a powerful and hugely influential section of the global marketplace and channelling that pre-eminence into occupational health and safety and environmental and business sustainability can and will make a major difference in the workplace in all of the developed and many of the developing nations, territories, sectors and markets.

“I am convinced that together we are capable of going a long, long way towards achieving our vision that no one should be killed, injured or made ill by their work. It is an enormous challenge but one we can and must aim for if we are to embed within every company, business unit, manager and shop floor operative the belief that safety comes first. Behavioural changes are key to this and influencing the way people think and act is becoming the new business imperative.”

The British Safety Council operates in more than 50 countries serving 7,500 corporate members, offering a range of internationally validated audits, awards and qualifications aimed at raising standards.