Paul Gordon reports from the World Congress in Safety and Health in Istanbul, Turkey

13 Sep

Good afternoon everybody. I am reporting from the XIX World Congress in Safety and Health here in Istanbul, Turkey.

It is one of the world’s largest, if not the largest, health and safety conferences. There are reported to be delegates here from more than 120 countries. And it’s hot, far too hot to be wearing a suit and tie.

Istanbul is one of the great cities of the world. Anyone visiting from Western Europe will notice the distinct change in feel and unique character of the place. Spread on either sides of the Bosphorus Strait it is the only city in the world to be situated on two continents, both Europe and Asia. Whilst more closely associated with Europe in political and sporting terms, the city nevertheless feels much more Asian than European.

It’s a lovely old city, dripping in history and culture. In fact, culture is one of the buzzwords at the conference – building a global safety culture.

I’m here to represent the British Safety Council in our public benefit work, and to give presentations in two of the conference symposia. We try to engage with as many stakeholders as possible in order to disseminate our key messages that no one should be killed, injured or made ill by their work, and highlighting the plight of young workers in particular. So far, it’s one down, one to go on the presentation stakes. A very positive reaction to my first delivery yesterday (I would say that I know, but its true), talking about the challenges of engaging with small businesses, with lots of interest in the role played by the British Safety Council. Tomorrow’s presentation will be looking at the British Safety Council campaign for young worker safety.

Some interesting topics throughout the congress. I have been talking with delegates from as far a field as Singapore and Azerbaijan. The UK is represented here by, amongst others, Judith Hackett, Chair of the Health and Safety Executive who spoke about the Global Challenge of a changing world of work and the global economy.

But for now from me its Güle güle (cheerio) from Turkey.

About our blogger

Paul Gordon is the British Safety Council’s policy and research manager.

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